RIN Data

DOE/EE RIN: 1904-AC11 Publication ID: Fall 2016 
Title: Energy Conservation Standards for Manufactured Housing  
Abstract:

Section 413 of EISA requires that DOE establish energy conservation standards for manufactured housing.  See 42 U.S.C. 17071(a)(1). DOE is directed to base the energy efficiency standards on the most recent version of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), except where DOE finds that the IECC is not cost effective, or a more stringent standard would be more cost effective, based on the impact of the IECC on the purchase price of manufactured housing and on total life-cycle construction and operating costs.  DOE undertook a successful negotiated rulemaking under the Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee in accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act and the Negotiated Rulemaking Act to negotiate proposed Federal standards for the energy efficiency of manufactured homes. As part of the consensus reached, the negotiating group recommended that DOE conduct additional analysis to inform the selection of solar heat gain coefficient requirements in certain climate zones and seek information regarding window fenestration pertaining to manufactured housing. A request for information was issued on these topics.

 
Agency: Department of Energy(DOE)  Priority: Other Significant 
RIN Status: Previously published in the Unified Agenda   Agenda Stage of Rulemaking: Final Rule Stage 
Major: No  Unfunded Mandates: No 
EO 13771 Designation:  
CFR Citation: 10 CFR 460   
Legal Authority: 42 U.S.C. 17071   
Legal Deadline:
Action Source Description Date
Final  Statutory    12/19/2011 

Statement of Need:

Section 413 of EISA requires that DOE establish energy conservation standards for manufactured housing.

Summary of the Legal Basis:

Section 413 of EISA requires that DOE establish energy conservation standards for manufactured housing. See 42 U.S.C. 17071(a)(1). 

Alternatives:

DOE is directed to base the energy conservation standards on the most recent version of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), except where DOE finds that the IECC is not cost effective, or a more stringent standard would be more cost effective, based on the impact of the IECC on the purchase price of manufactured housing and on total life-cycle construction and operating costs.

Anticipated Costs and Benefits:

DOE finds that the benefits to the Nation of the proposed energy conservation standards for manufactured housing outweigh the burdens. For manufactured housing, DOE estimates that energy savings will be 0.884 quads (Single-section) and 1.428 quads (Multi-section) over 30 years and the net benefit to the Nation will be between $1.26 billion (Single-section) and $2.18 billion (Multi-section) and $4.03 billion (Single-section) and $6.75 billion (Multi-section).

Risks:

Timetable:
Action Date FR Cite
ANPRM  02/22/2010  75 FR 7556   
ANPRM Comment Period End  03/24/2010    
Request for Information  06/25/2013  78 FR 37995   
RFI Comment Period End  07/25/2013 
Extension of Term; Notice of Public Meeting  10/01/2014  79 FR 59154   
Request for Information  02/11/2015  80 FR 7550   
RFI Comment Period End  03/13/2015 
NPRM  06/17/2016  81 FR 39756   
NPRM Comment Period End  08/16/2016 
Final Action  11/00/2016 
Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required: Undetermined  Government Levels Affected: None 
Federalism: No 
Included in the Regulatory Plan: Yes 
RIN Information URL: www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/rulemaking.aspx?ruleid=97   Public Comment URL: www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=EERE-2009-BT-BC-0021  
RIN Data Printed in the FR: No 
Agency Contact:
Joseph Hagerman
Building Technologies Office, EE-2J
Department of Energy
Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy
1000 Independence Avenue SW.,
Washington, DC 20585
Phone:202 586-4549
Email: joseph.hagerman@ee.doe.gov